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  • How Do Employers Reduce the Number of Workplace Injuries?

    On behalf of The Frickey Law Firm posted on Thursday, February 28, 2013.

    Employers know the risks that they put their employees in by requesting them to perform certain jobs. No matter the industry, it is possible for a worker to become injured. In such situations, workers’ compensation is often implemented, allowing an employee to afford time off while they recover from a workplace injury.

    There are many different types of jobs in Colorado and, because of this, many different ways a worker can become injured. For construction workers, the dangers are obvious. Heavy labor can cause long-term wear while heavy machinery can cause sudden and catastrophic injury. Workers’ compensation will likely be necessary for a person to recover from the consequences of either.

    Consider a less-physical occupation, such as any desk job. Though there may not be any heavy machinery and there is not nearly as much heavy lifting, there is the wear and tear associated with typing on a computer all day. Eyesight degrades, carpal tunnel arises, back and neck pain become apparent – these things can leave a worker in worse shape than when they started the job. This worse shape leaves them vulnerable to severe injuries to the areas of their bodies that have been stressed, potentially leaving the employer liable.

    In order to address such issues, some employers are bringing in ergonomics specialists to make sure that employees are performing their jobs with their bodies in mind. Other companies are purchasing new furniture designed to address such issues and making it easier for employees to request such changes. Still others are incorporating stretching exercises and mandating breaks so that workers have time to get up and move, allowing them to relieve tension created by working in the same position for hours on end.

    An employer is not exempt from responsibility for its workers’ injuries, even if it does implement such procedures. These procedures simply make injuries less likely by addressing the factors that can lead to dangerous circumstances.

    Source: PayScale, “Four Ergonomic Tips to Keep Employees and Workers’ Comp Budgets Healthy,” Jessica Miller-Merrell, Feb. 20, 2013